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comes spring

Mostly fanfiction, motorcycles, engine porn, motorbike racing, and technobabble. With photos of Kyoto on the side. And a complete lack of consistency strewn throughout.
Oct 22 '14

theamericanavenger:

theamericanavenger:

Okay guys this is kinda important. GQ just came in the male and for the first time in a long while it had a really important article…

I just sat here for like the last half hour reading this and I’m incredibly appalled at our justice system in regards to the military. The article interviews about 23 men who have all been sexually assaulted in some branch of the military. The PTSD from sexual assault in the military is more prevalent than PTSD from combat…

If you have a chance I suggest reading this article…and the title is a quote that one of the victims Doctor told him…

Hey guys! I’m very impressed and extremely happy to see this post gaining a lot of speed over the last few days! A few people have requested it, so i’ve gone ahead and scanned the pages of the article for those who want to read it, to read. 

So, here it is!

Oct 21 '14
Shibazuke (Kyoto pickled eggplant) and chirimen (itty-bitty fishies) onigiri! I forget the name of the place but they make them fresh so they’re still hot when you get them! These are my favorite!

If you’ve had onigiri, what’s your favorite kind?

Shibazuke (Kyoto pickled eggplant) and chirimen (itty-bitty fishies) onigiri! I forget the name of the place but they make them fresh so they’re still hot when you get them! These are my favorite!

If you’ve had onigiri, what’s your favorite kind?

Oct 21 '14

astasia:

I gave myself a break and finally finished these chibis!

Chibis weregoats (hey! driftinwithkaiju !!!) for all the sugary purposes of this fandom xD

Thanks to Garnetquyen, who started with chibi!satyr and chibi!faun thing! Also summoning velvetcadence, kageillusionz and takhesiz, because going to hell is funnier when you have nice company! :P

Oct 21 '14
aggressivewhenstartled:

roane72:

needed this this morning. :P

Oh my god I needed this so bad myself. I need this up above my desk for every time there is someone wrong on the internet.

aggressivewhenstartled:

roane72:

needed this this morning. :P

Oh my god I needed this so bad myself. I need this up above my desk for every time there is someone wrong on the internet.

(Source: whiskeydaisy)

Oct 20 '14
wesker mine was made with a different flavor! But yes! Very small and a bit expensive but very cute!

wesker mine was made with a different flavor! But yes! Very small and a bit expensive but very cute!

(Source: milklotus)

Oct 20 '14

Anonymous asked:

I just need to ask this! What exactly is post mortem folk and where can I find it? I reading your tatoofic and I clearly just fell in love with it, it's absolutely fucking amazing!! But, yeah post mortem folk...

Look up Dobbs Dead on youtube!

Dobbs Dead is a band comprised of Volker Merschky and Simone Pfaff (the originators of trash polka tattoo style). I’ll be honest, as much as I love interesting and unusual music, I think they’ve only one song I can listen to without rubbing my face with both hands and asking myself what I’m doing.

(and thank you for reading and liking my fic, i hope you like dobbs dead but i will understand if you don’t. ;D)

Oct 20 '14

Ask Tattoo Fic Charles and/or Erik

It’s on again! I’ve changed the rules/procedure a little bit to make this easier for myself. 

euphorbic:

When I was writing Strict Machine I did a ‘What Motorcycle Are You?’ game as a way of interacting more with readers. I’ve been trying to think of something along those lines for The boy with the heart on his sleeve but it just isn’t the same kind of story. 

So, instead I thought it might be entertaining to do an Ask Tattoo Fic Charles and/or Erik thing instead. 

All you have to do is:

  1. State whether the question is for Charles, Erik (or Raven). Please only ask one character.
  2. Ask a question.
  3. One ask per person! 
  4. All answers will be tagged #ask tattoo fic Charles or Erik.

All questions will be answered in-character so I can’t guarantee Erik or Charles will always be nice. But if you want nice, I suggest you ask Charles (Charles likes to compliment his askers) or Raven. Treat this as a video-less Skype chat; you send in your question and the characters will respond ‘live’. 

If I get more questions than expected, I will mainly concentrate on answering the asks that I think will prompt the most interesting answers. 

Cut off for questions will be midnight, Monday the 20th of October UTC/GMT -7 hours (that’s California time).

image

Edited on 10/19 for clarity and to make things easier on myself.

Oct 20 '14
we-are-star-stuff:

Ada Lovelace (1815 -1852) was born Augusta Ada Byron, the only legitimate child of Annabella Milbanke and the poet Lord Byron. Her mother, Lady Byron, had mathematical training (Byron called her his ‘Princess of Parallelograms’) and insisted that Ada, who was tutored privately, study mathematics too - an unusual education for a woman.
In the early nineteenth century there were no “professional” scientists (indeed, the word “scientist” was only coined by William Whewell in 1836) but the participation of noblewomen in intellectual pursuits was not widely encouraged.
One of the gentlemanly scientists of the era was to become Ada’s lifelong friend. Charles Babbage, Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge, was known as the inventor of the Difference Engine, an elaborate calculating machine that operated by the method of finite differences. 
Ada first met Babbage when she was seventeen, shortly after her right royal coming out party. She went, along with her mother, to see what she called his “thinking machine” a portion of his difference engine on display in his drawing room. An onlooker reported of the event:

“While other visitors gazed on the workings of this beautiful instrument with the sort of expression, I dare say the sort feeling, that some savages are said to have shown on first seeing a looking glass or hearing a gun, Miss Byron, young as she was, understood its working, and saw the great beauty of the invention.”

This was the sort of mathematical adventure that Ada was looking for. She had quickly exhausted the expertise of her tutors and university was not open to women in those days. 
In 1842, an Italian mathematician, Louis Menebrea, published a memoir in French on the subject of the Analytical Engine. Babbage enlisted Ada as translator for the memoir, and during a nine-month period in 1842-43, she worked feverishly on the article and a set of notes she appended to it. These are the source of her enduring fame. The notes included the first published description of a stepwise sequence of operations for solving certain mathematical problems and Ada is often referred to as ‘the first programmer’.
Perhaps more importantly, the article contained statements by Ada that from a modern perspective are visionary. Ada called herself “an Analyst (& Metaphysician),” and the combination was put to use in the notes. She understood the plans for the device as well as Babbage but was better at articulating its promise. She rightly saw it as what we would call a general-purpose computer. Her notes anticipated future developments, including computer-generated music. She speculated that the Engine ‘might act upon other things besides number… the Engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent’. The idea of a machine that could manipulate symbols in accordance with rules and that number could represent entities other than quantity mark the fundamental transition from calculation to computation. Ada was the first to explicitly articulate this notion and in this she appears to have seen further than Babbage. She has been referred to as ‘prophet of the computer age’ and ‘the Founder of Scientific Computing’. Certainly she was the first to express the potential for computers outside mathematics.
Ada died aged 36 on 27th November 1852 from a mix of cancer and the side effects of blood letting.
The Analytical Engine remained a vision, until Ada’s notes became one of the critical documents to inspire Alan Turing’s work on the first modern computers in the 1940s.
Her contributions to science were resurrected only recently. Her thwarted potential, and her passion and vision for technology, have made her a powerful symbol for modern women in technology. 
About Ada Lovelace Day
Ada Lovelace Day was founded by Suw Charman-Anderson and aims to raise the profile of women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) by encouraging people around the world to talk about the women whose work they admire. This international day of celebration helps people learn about the achievements of women in STEM, inspiring others and creating new role models for young and old alike.
Charman-Anderson said that Ada’s story resonates “because there are still people who seek to discredit her achievements. It is something that many women working in tech are only too familiar with. We can look at Ada and recognize that our own challenges are similar to hers, and her achievements are the sorts of things that we strive towards.”
The inspiration for Ada Lovelace Day came from psychologist Penelope Lockwood, who carried out a study which found that women need to see female role models more than men need to see male role models. “Outstanding women can function as inspirational examples of success,” she said, “illustrating the kinds of achievements that are possible for women around them. They demonstrate that it is possible to overcome traditional gender barriers, indicating to other women that high levels of success are indeed attainable.”
[x x x x]

we-are-star-stuff:

Ada Lovelace (1815 -1852) was born Augusta Ada Byron, the only legitimate child of Annabella Milbanke and the poet Lord Byron. Her mother, Lady Byron, had mathematical training (Byron called her his ‘Princess of Parallelograms’) and insisted that Ada, who was tutored privately, study mathematics too - an unusual education for a woman.

In the early nineteenth century there were no “professional” scientists (indeed, the word “scientist” was only coined by William Whewell in 1836) but the participation of noblewomen in intellectual pursuits was not widely encouraged.

One of the gentlemanly scientists of the era was to become Ada’s lifelong friend. Charles Babbage, Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge, was known as the inventor of the Difference Engine, an elaborate calculating machine that operated by the method of finite differences. 

Ada first met Babbage when she was seventeen, shortly after her right royal coming out party. She went, along with her mother, to see what she called his “thinking machine” a portion of his difference engine on display in his drawing room. An onlooker reported of the event:

“While other visitors gazed on the workings of this beautiful instrument with the sort of expression, I dare say the sort feeling, that some savages are said to have shown on first seeing a looking glass or hearing a gun, Miss Byron, young as she was, understood its working, and saw the great beauty of the invention.”

This was the sort of mathematical adventure that Ada was looking for. She had quickly exhausted the expertise of her tutors and university was not open to women in those days. 

In 1842, an Italian mathematician, Louis Menebrea, published a memoir in French on the subject of the Analytical Engine. Babbage enlisted Ada as translator for the memoir, and during a nine-month period in 1842-43, she worked feverishly on the article and a set of notes she appended to it. These are the source of her enduring fame. The notes included the first published description of a stepwise sequence of operations for solving certain mathematical problems and Ada is often referred to as ‘the first programmer’.

Perhaps more importantly, the article contained statements by Ada that from a modern perspective are visionary. Ada called herself “an Analyst (& Metaphysician),” and the combination was put to use in the notes. She understood the plans for the device as well as Babbage but was better at articulating its promise. She rightly saw it as what we would call a general-purpose computer. Her notes anticipated future developments, including computer-generated music. She speculated that the Engine ‘might act upon other things besides number… the Engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent’. The idea of a machine that could manipulate symbols in accordance with rules and that number could represent entities other than quantity mark the fundamental transition from calculation to computation. Ada was the first to explicitly articulate this notion and in this she appears to have seen further than Babbage. She has been referred to as ‘prophet of the computer age’ and ‘the Founder of Scientific Computing’. Certainly she was the first to express the potential for computers outside mathematics.

Ada died aged 36 on 27th November 1852 from a mix of cancer and the side effects of blood letting.

The Analytical Engine remained a vision, until Ada’s notes became one of the critical documents to inspire Alan Turing’s work on the first modern computers in the 1940s.

Her contributions to science were resurrected only recently. Her thwarted potential, and her passion and vision for technology, have made her a powerful symbol for modern women in technology. 

About Ada Lovelace Day

Ada Lovelace Day was founded by Suw Charman-Anderson and aims to raise the profile of women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) by encouraging people around the world to talk about the women whose work they admire. This international day of celebration helps people learn about the achievements of women in STEM, inspiring others and creating new role models for young and old alike.

Charman-Anderson said that Ada’s story resonates “because there are still people who seek to discredit her achievements. It is something that many women working in tech are only too familiar with. We can look at Ada and recognize that our own challenges are similar to hers, and her achievements are the sorts of things that we strive towards.”

The inspiration for Ada Lovelace Day came from psychologist Penelope Lockwood, who carried out a study which found that women need to see female role models more than men need to see male role models. “Outstanding women can function as inspirational examples of success,” she said, “illustrating the kinds of achievements that are possible for women around them. They demonstrate that it is possible to overcome traditional gender barriers, indicating to other women that high levels of success are indeed attainable.”

[x x x x]

Oct 20 '14
1337animeami:

I absolutely love this make-up too <3 Chesire Cat ftw

1337animeami:

I absolutely love this make-up too <3 

Chesire Cat ftw

Oct 20 '14

suchekomnaty replied to your photoset “I usually buy ‘elegantly ugly’ stuff but this go round at the…”

It really *is* a Little Pet Shop of Horrors teacup! Two out of the three brown hearts of the blue flowers (stigmas?) look exactly like little mouey mouths, anyway. Just the thing to bring your face up close to repeatedly.

I have drank far more tea in the last 36 hours than I have in months. I love this silly thing. It has so many details. Even the bottom of the cup has a little hand-drawn spiral and the ‘foot’ (or base) of the cup even has a blue band I hadn’t notice before. Really strong workmanship! 

And cutely monstrous, too!